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The Streaming Media East Conference Is New and Improved for 2018

Posted by on Jan 17, 2018 in Video Marketing | Comments Off

Online video has evolved, and so has Streaming Media. You might have heard about some changes at Streaming Media, one of which is that we’ve completely rethought and revamped Streaming Media East to provide a better experience for attendees. This year, we will be presenting five targeted tracks to help attendees find the content that is most important to them, and to appeal to people from every part of an organization. Here’s the breakdown:

Technology How-To Track: This track is for CTOs, engineers, and developers who want one thing—solutions. The video ecosystem is a fragmented mix of platforms and devices: Learn from the pros how you can eliminate the bottlenecks and deliver results. Presenters will offer sessions on encoding and transcoding, packaging and delivery, player and UI development, and formats, protocols, and standards. If you’re looking for deep dives into HEVC, VP9, AV1, DASH, CMAF, WebRTC, video optimization, and QoS/QoE, you’ve come to the right place.

Business/Strategy Track: Attention CEOs, CSOs, media strategists, and business development executives: This is your home at Streaming Media East. This forward-thinking track offers high-level strategic discussions where you can learn from the best where the online video economy is moving. The Business/Strategy Track will shed light on the future of the online video marketplace, discussing ways broadcasters, cable and satellite operators, MVPDs, and content rights holders can unlock the value of OTT and TV Everywhere. It will point to improvements in content creation, acquisition, and monetization, and reveal coming shifts in consumer viewing habits. The track will also feature sessions devoted exclusively to the needs of enterprises and educational institutions.

Live Streaming Summit: Now in its second year at Streaming Media East, the Live Streaming Summit covers all things live—tentpole entertainment and sports events, webcasting in the enterprise, streaming live to social networks, delivering live linear channels, and more. The summit covers every step of the live video workflow and is a must-attend event for technical and business decision makers whose jobs depend on delivering large-scale live events and live linear channels to multiple devices and platforms.

OnlineVideo.net’s Video Marketing Power Summit: Online video viewing is exploding, and online video advertising is taking over from TV. For the first time, Streaming Media East has an event just for video marketing, and you need to be there whether you’re guiding the first efforts of an SMB or the global cross-platform strategy of a Fortune 500. Chaired by OnlineVideo.net editor Troy Dreier, this track will look at the obstacles challenging advertisers and publishers, reaching consumers where they live, work, and shop. We’ll have the biggest names in video marketing offering lessons and speaking from their own experiences. Because this is Streaming Media East, we’ll offer a deep-dive that the other conferences can’t match. And did we mention there will be plenty of time for networking? Does your CMO need to be here? You know it.

Streaming Media East Spotlight—AI, Machine Learning, and the Future of Everything: Yes, everything, because every part of the video ecosystem will be impacted by artificial intelligence. Think we’re exaggerating? Look around: AI and machine learning are already letting smart companies put big data to work by creating more customized offerings. This isn’t the future; it’s the present. The heaviest hitters are using AI in automated highlight generation, video processing, sentiment analysis, facial recognition, hyper-personalized content recommendations, ad targeting, viewer retention, and customer churn prevention. That’s a lot to spotlight, but this track will explore the technical, financial, and ethical implications of this brave new world. Don’t get left behind! You’ll come out with a deeper understanding of how to make your entire operation smarter, faster, and more profitable.

We’ll also be presenting the annual Content Delivery Summit, with Jason Thibeault of the Streaming Video Alliance taking over as chair. Find out more and to register for this year’s events.

[This article appears in the January/February 2018 issue of Streaming Media Magazine as “New Improved for 2018.” Troy Dreier contributed to this editorial.]

News UK sees vertical video ads taking off

Posted by on Jan 15, 2018 in Video Marketing | Comments Off

News UK is bullish on the opportunity for vertical video, and it’s starting to see the fruits of its labor.

The publisher of British newspapers The Sun and The Times of London launched V-Studio last June, a suite of tools for creating vertical video content, in order to relieve the creative barrier of reshooting content for mobile. Typically, shooting vertical video is a low priority for U.K. creative agencies. But clients that commit to a certain amount of budget directly with News UK won’t have to pay additional creative costs for it.

Vertical video demand is being driven by audiences, platforms and advertisers alike, according to the publisher: 91 percent of the audience for tabloid brand The Sun comes from mobile, while that figure is 79 percent for subscription title the Times.

Over the last four months, News UK has run 16 vertical video ad campaigns across its owned and operated platforms and Snapchat Discover edition. Twelve of those were for luxury clients such as Michael Kors and Mr Porter, which are adopting the format more quickly than other sectors.

Luxury clients have typically been reluctant to jump into outstream video because of the lack of control around what their content is adjacent to. But they have been receptive to vertical video, a nonintrusive format that takes up the full mobile screen and users can swipe off of. Equally, luxury advertisers spend a lot of money on TV ad creative, and vertical video now offers a useful additional digital distribution route for these at scale.

“The market suggests that outstream video cannot replace the lack of supply of pre-roll in the industry, but we see the opposite,” said Oliver Lewis, director of digital strategy and partnerships at News UK. “If the vertical mobile canvas is used correctly, it can be an alternative and complementary to instream. Outstream driven by mobile vertical is a big opportunity.”

V-Studio launched with seven different interactive vertical formats for clients. Recently, the Times used the vertical format that incorporates live data feeds in a campaign for Michael Kors. The ad used viewers’ location data to show them their nearest Michael Kors store, after 33 percent of Times mobile users opted to share their locations for the campaign. Different creative is served based on audience preferences. The campaign click-through rate was 75 percent above the average for News UK’s nonvertical video placement, according to Lewis, although he wouldn’t share absolute numbers.


News UK’s data-led vertical video creative

News UK has said vertical video formats increase interactions sixfold compared to horizontal ads. The publisher is testing how the format performs with more branding metrics like purchase intent, rather than interactions with the ads.

Three-quarters of the vertical video campaigns run by News UK repurpose existing assets from clients, while V-Studio shoots 25 percent as part of branded content campaigns. The format is now included in all News UK video briefs. The ambition is to have vertical video included in every branded content campaign News UK runs by the end of the year. Vertical video appears in about 60 percent of branded content campaigns to date.



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CPMs for News UK’s vertical videos fetch twice what the average pre-roll video ad would on the Times’ mobile site and 25 percent more than pre-roll video ads on The Sun, according to Lewis. News UK makes 50 million monthly impressions available for vertical video across its network. In December, vertical video inventory on the Times sold out, and Lewis expects to sell out in January, too. The publisher is looking to increase supply on the Times and through its other brands like Dream Team and Style Play.

“We don’t expect to see a deflation on [the CPMs for] the Times. It’s a premium environment, and it’s performing well,” said Lewis. “We won’t create inventory to backfill. It’s not an opportunity to lower yield; there’s a flight to quality, and that should be reflected in the rate.”

By the second half of the year, News UK expects the number of vertical video campaigns it runs to overtake traditional mobile outstream formats. New formats are in the pipeline, too: The publisher is testing shoppable vertical video formats to release in the coming months. Virtual reality and 360-degree vertical creative are also in the cards this year.

Direct deals rather than programmatic have been the focus so far, although advertisers can buy News UK’s vertical format through Unruly’s SSP. Lewis said it wouldn’t rule out further partnerships over the course the year.

“There has been some negative press around the format,” said Lewis. “We believe it’s an opportunity to capture a large amount of video budget; it needs support and growth from all publishers.”

Internet Video Ads And The DAA – National Law Review

Posted by on Jan 14, 2018 in Video Marketing | Comments Off

You are responsible for reading, understanding and agreeing to the National Law Review’s (NLR’s) and the National Law Forum LLC’s  Terms of Use and Privacy Policy before using the National Law Review website. The National Law Review is a free to use, no-log in database of legal and business articles. The content and links on www.NatLawReview.com are intended for general information purposes only. Any legal analysis, legislative updates or other content and links should not be construed as legal or professional advice or a substitute for such advice. No attorney-client or confidential relationship is formed by the transmission of information between you and the National Law Review website or any of the law firms, attorneys or other professionals or organizations who include content on the National Law Review website. If you require legal or professional advice, kindly contact an attorney or other suitable professional advisor.  

Some states have laws and ethical rules regarding solicitation and advertisement practices by attorneys and/or other professionals. The National Law Review is not a law firm nor is www.NatLawReview.com  intended to be  a referral service for attorneys and/or other professionals. The NLR does not wish, nor does it intend, to solicit the business of anyone or to refer anyone to an attorney or other professional.  NLR does not answer legal questions nor will we refer you to an attorney or other professional if you request such information from us. 

Under certain state laws the following statements may be required on this website and we have included them in order to be in full compliance with these rules. The choice of a lawyer or other professional is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. Attorney Advertising Notice: Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Statement in compliance with Texas Rules of Professional Conduct. Unless otherwise noted, attorneys are not certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, nor can NLR attest to the accuracy of any notation of Legal Specialization or other Professional Credentials.

The National Law Review – National Law Forum LLC 4700 Gilbert Ave. Suite 47 #230 Western Springs, IL 60558  Telephone  (708) 357-3317 If you would ike to contact us via email please click here.

New Compliance Warning: Interest-Based Video Ads Must Provide Notice and Choice

Posted by on Jan 13, 2018 in Video Marketing | Comments Off

You are responsible for reading, understanding and agreeing to the National Law Review’s (NLR’s) and the National Law Forum LLC’s  Terms of Use and Privacy Policy before using the National Law Review website. The National Law Review is a free to use, no-log in database of legal and business articles. The content and links on www.NatLawReview.com are intended for general information purposes only. Any legal analysis, legislative updates or other content and links should not be construed as legal or professional advice or a substitute for such advice. No attorney-client or confidential relationship is formed by the transmission of information between you and the National Law Review website or any of the law firms, attorneys or other professionals or organizations who include content on the National Law Review website. If you require legal or professional advice, kindly contact an attorney or other suitable professional advisor.  

Some states have laws and ethical rules regarding solicitation and advertisement practices by attorneys and/or other professionals. The National Law Review is not a law firm nor is www.NatLawReview.com  intended to be  a referral service for attorneys and/or other professionals. The NLR does not wish, nor does it intend, to solicit the business of anyone or to refer anyone to an attorney or other professional.  NLR does not answer legal questions nor will we refer you to an attorney or other professional if you request such information from us. 

Under certain state laws the following statements may be required on this website and we have included them in order to be in full compliance with these rules. The choice of a lawyer or other professional is an important decision and should not be based solely upon advertisements. Attorney Advertising Notice: Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Statement in compliance with Texas Rules of Professional Conduct. Unless otherwise noted, attorneys are not certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization, nor can NLR attest to the accuracy of any notation of Legal Specialization or other Professional Credentials.

The National Law Review – National Law Forum LLC 4700 Gilbert Ave. Suite 47 #230 Western Springs, IL 60558  Telephone  (708) 357-3317 If you would ike to contact us via email please click here.

Think Tank: Marketers to Take Advantage of Mobile Video Advertising in 2018

Posted by on Jan 13, 2018 in Video Marketing | Comments Off

Last year was a roller coaster for digital advertising. We saw digital ad spend top $209 billion globally with digital finally overtaking television spend in the process. Challenges like fraud, brand safety and viewability took center stage as marketers demanded a cleaner supply chain.

Brands worked to increase the amount of transparency and control they had over their digital spending, augmented reality proved that it’s here to stay, and marketers doubled down on video ads — particularly on mobile.

It’s impossible to predict the future, and it’s hard to pinpoint what will dominate our industry next year. Trends come and go, some evolving to the point of full maturity and widespread adoption, but just as many start strong only to quickly fade. As we put 2017 behind us and look ahead to what 2018 will bring, one thing is immediately clear, we live in a mobile world, and advertisers must adapt to this trend.

Change is necessary for long-term success and we’re starting to see that happen with mobile. Marketers are beginning to truly embrace a mobile-first approach to digital advertising — a tactic that isn’t as pervasive as you might think. For example, during the Black Friday shopping period and throughout the fourth quarter, retail brands such as Amazon and Home Depot adapted their apps and campaigns to reach mobile users — a smart move, considering retail purchasing was nearly 40 percent mobile. At the same time, mobile video is enjoying a meteoric rise in popularity, is expected to take over 75 percent of all mobile traffic by 2023, and will be the single largest area of focus for digital marketers this year.

Advertisers have finally seen the light and are beginning to understand just how important mobile is to reach a target audience. But while mobile dominated retail marketing in the fourth quarter, there are three ways marketers can leverage seamless and effective mobile ads in 2018.

The Year Mobile Video Gets Personal

After totaling more than $58 billion in spend last year, mobile video isn’t going anywhere. In fact, it’s only going to get more important. As advertisers reallocate their spend and better understand its performance, I expect to see in-app mobile video usage not only increase, but also become more personalized based on user behavior. Consequently, brands will be able to truly reach their target audiences with content that is applicable and attractive.

Achieving this involves changing the way advertisers optimize their mobile campaigns — they have to be seamless, and they have to be relevant to the user. Up until recently, most have simply repurposed their desktop ads for mobile without much consideration for the nuances of the medium and the experience that follows. But if the experience lacks due to slow delivery, or content that doesn’t resonate, users will close out of the app entirely. The road to more effective personalization starts with delivery.

Video End Cards Will Help Boost Mobile Engagement

Leading digital marketers are already making use of end cards in their video ads that allow consumers to further engage with the brand after viewing the video ad. This often includes a call-to-action such as “learn more” or “buy now.” While the utilization of end cards in mobile video is important on its own, there’s so much more that can be done to activate customer interest using this tactic.

Results have shown that personalized interactive end cards immediately following 15-second videos drive up to nine times higher engagement than static banner ads. On average, about 15 percent of consumers who watch a video ad will engage with interactive end cards once the video is complete. This places engagement rates with end cards well above typical click-through rates for digital advertising.

In 2017, we saw brands beginning to leverage audience data from their DMPs and their media partners in order to create more personalized end card experiences. This allows brands to move national video advertising messages closer to one-to-one marketing opportunities. These personalized end-cards will contribute to the future of video ads, helping brands activate customer interest in-app and spur them to buy.

Vertical Video Is Looking Up

According to research from the IAB, 90 percent of time spent on a smartphone is in the vertical orientation. As such, vertical video (or horizontal videos that are wrapped to create vertical experiences) is a good format to use in apps where consumers are already used to being served interstitial ads. These ads provide marketers up to four times higher visual impact, and provide a personal television commercial opportunity. However, collectively the industry isn’t quite there yet when it comes to adopting this as a best practice.

Today, marketers primarily run video ads in landscape format. Yet more and more of our favorite apps are becoming vertical-oriented — Snapchat, Twitter and Spotify, to name a few. By not creating mobile video ads that display well in a vertical orientation, advertisers are not only leaving potential revenue on the table, they could inadvertently be causing users to jump out of the app.

I expect that marketers will fully realize this change in 2018 and begin shooting video in vertical format so it can be easily consumed by users who are already showing a preference toward this orientation.

Video Will Eat the World

While we can’t say with absolute certainty what will dominate ad-tech in 2018, mobile video is poised to continue its upward momentum, particularly in-app. A recent study by Ericsson notes that 75 percent of all mobile traffic will be through video by 2023, and almost 80 percent of programmatic ad spend will go mobile by 2019. It’s never been more critical for marketers to take advantage of what has already become a popular, if not preferred, mode of consumption for users.

Unsurprisingly, consumers have already adjusted their habits to account for a more mobile world, and currently spend more than 80 percent of their smartphone time in-app. It’s time for advertisers to dive in deep on mobile as well, and 2018 looks to be the year that this finally materializes.

Anne Frisbie is senior vice president of global brand and programmatic at InMobi.

 

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Facebook could learn a lot from Spotify when it comes to making money from video

Posted by on Jan 12, 2018 in Video Marketing | Comments Off

BeyonceWatching one ad to get 30 minutes of Beyonce is a pretty good dealKevork Djansezian / Stringer / Getty Images

  • Facebook is trying to figure out the right video ad model for Watch.
  • It’s not clear whether consumers will be OK with pre-roll or mid-roll ads. 
  • A solution may lie in Spotify’s video ads, which are upfront with consumers about giving them 30 minutes of music with no ad interruptions after a single ad.

Facebook has painted itself into a corner.

The company wants to be a major video-advertising player, but its executives have declared that they are firmly against pre-roll ads, those video ads that run right before video clips.

That’s probably a smart position to take for now, at least when it comes to Facebook’s news feed – which is where the bulk of Facebook’s video consumption occurs. Shoving a must-watch ad into someone’s feed before video content they may or may not even be interested in in the first place sure seems like a way to infuriate consumers.

But for the fledgling Facebook Watch, which is designed to be a section of Facebook where people hang out and watch videos because that’s what they’ve set out to do, pre-rolls have to be on the table. And, according to Recode, a test of six-second pre-roll ads is coming to Watch this year.

However, Facebook doesn’t seem to love this strategy. It has publicly, and in discussions with media partners, talked up mid-roll ads – those that arrive midway through a video, during content breaks, like TV commercials.

The problem Facebook faces is that the mid-rolls ads currently interrupt mostly very short videos, the kind of people are used to blazing through on their phones, though longer content is in the works.

And the early buzz from consumers and some publishers on mid-rolls hasn’t been great. It’s very easy for viewers to bail out once these ads start playing – which means they essentially stop watching or leave the site/app altogether.

Spotify offers Facebook a model

But there’s another approach. 

Instead of emulating YouTube (which again, it seems to be doing with Watch), Facebook could learn a lot from – wait for it – Spotify.

The model here is simple: give users the run of Watch without ads for a pre-set period – as long as they watch one quick ad upfront.

Spotify’s not a major digital ad player you say? It’s about subscriptions, and maybe advertisers sponsoring playlists, right? Perhaps, but it’s also got one of the more elegant – and, more importantly, tolerable – ad products out there.

Since 2015, Spotify has offered advertisers what it calls Sponsored Sessions. Basically, when using the free Spotify service, people encounter a video ad preceded by the following message: “The next 30 minutes are ad free, thanks to the following sponsor.” Then you watch a Volvo or a Wild Turkey ad, and you’re off to streaming whatever music you fancy.

Not only is it a pretty good deal – you get premium content (like, say, Beyonce) and all you have to do is sit through a 15 or 30-second ad that you can pay attention to, or not.

But also, you know what’s coming, and that your experience won’t get hijacked by a mid-roll at any given moment. 

That’s because Spotify is upfront about the deal. It’s exactly the kind of overt appeal that advertisers and publishers need to take in an era when consumers are skipping and avoiding ads all over the planet, and any interruptions are viewed with hostility.

Transparency with consumers

SpotifySteven Tweedie

When launching Sponsored Sessions, the streaming service had the advantage of building a video-ad experience from scratch rather than having to retrofit a model, says Brian Benedik, Spotify’s vice president and global head of sales.

Plus, the company’s core subscription model gave his team cover, since the whole company wasn’t relying on ads to pay for everything. Yet the approach has paid off – and most people can see the ads and tend to finish them (neither a given in digital video). Plus, TV advertisers can use their already paid-for TV ads. 

“It’s very transparent with consumers,” he told Business Insider just prior to setting out for the Consumer Electronics Show, where Spotify is planning a major presence in courting attending marketers. “We give them a proposition. And they get a long listening session.” And even better, marketers are seen as giving people something they love.

Wouldn’t this overt tactic make total sense for Facebook Watch? True, Facebook first has to get more humans to know that Watch exists. That’s no small matter. But once you get people into the fold, wouldn’t it make sense to set their expectations on advertising upfront?

Facebook has been researching the different ways people interact with ads in different environments. They have found that people will tolerate interruptive video ads as long as they aren’t too long.

Perhaps. But it’s awfully early in establishing the ad mores for Watch. Maybe 30 minutes of ad-free isn’t the way to go here. Shorter sessions might be better.

Either way, by spelling out the idea to consumers that you’ll be able to watch all the videos you want for a while after checking out such and such an ad could serve to make the whole platform more palatable.

To be sure, not every digital media company can afford restraint when it comes to how many ads they shove down our throats.

“Our business does allow us to be selective,” said Benedik.

But if anybody else has the revenue structure to be picky, and the power to set consumer expectations, it’s Facebook.